Beef Tips

Author: Angie Denton

ARSBC Symposium Will Be Aug. 29-30

New Mexico and Texas will host beef cattle reproduction workshop in Ruidoso, N.M.; registration is open now.

Registration is open for the 2018 Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle symposium to be hosted at the Ruidoso Convention Center, Ruidoso, N.M., Aug. 29-30.  More detailed program information and online registration is available at www.appliedreprostrategies.com.

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Performance of Early-Weaned Calves

By Justin Waggoner, beef systems specialist, Garden City, KS

Under normal production circumstances calves are typically weaned at 180-220 days of age, however under circumstances where forage supply is limited or cow body condition is lacking weaning calves at 180 days of age or less may be one of the easiest ways to reduce cow nutrient requirements and improve cow body condition. Many cattle producers express concerns over the thought of weaning 350-450 lb calves during the heat of the summer and believe that early-weaned calves will not perform well in a dry lot environment. In a recent study (Bailey et al. 2013) conducted at the K-State Agriculture Research Center-Hays, 243 spring-born calves were weaned at 113 ± 17 days of age and were limit-fed a common diet to achieve target average daily gains of 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 lbs per day during an 84 day receiving period.

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Early weaning calf health considerations

by A.J. Tarpoff, DVM, MS; extension veterinarian

Early weaning of calves during a drought can have many benefits to the cow herd such as improved body condition of the cows, improved rebreeding rates, increased forage availability, and possibly improved calf performance. However, increased management is essential for the young calves, and several factors should be considered before this decision is made.

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Monitor Ponds for Blue Green Algae

by A.J. Tarpoff, DVM, MS; extension veterinarian

Blue green algae blooms are an issue that usually gets discussed this time of year. Calm, sunny, dry, and hot days of summer create ideal conditions for blue green algae to thrive in our livestock ponds. Blue green algae occurrence is sporadic making its threat unpredictable. Despite its name, these blooms are not algae, but a cyanobacteria. Some of these cyanobacteria produce and release dangerous toxins that are of major concern for our livestock.

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Save the Date: K-State Ranching Summit August 15

Manhattan, Kan. –The K-State Beef Team is pleased to invite you to the 2018 K-State Ranching Summit, Aug. 15, 2018 at the KSU Alumni Center in Manhattan, KS.  The Ranching Summit event is designed to equip managers with the skills to address the challenges of ranching in the business climate of today and tomorrow. The theme of the program is “Beef 2030 – Pursuing technology, transparency and profitability.” Continue reading “Save the Date: K-State Ranching Summit August 15”

Tally Time: Keeping on schedule

By Sandy Johnson, extension beef specialist, Colby, KS

A year ago at this time, wet weather had delayed planting of many spring crops.  This year, cool soil temperatures are doing the same.  Grass growth has also been delayed, and in many cases winter feed supplies are running short.  The challenge for many operators is to give the grass as much time as possible given the current weather conditions, balanced with how long winter-feed supplies can be stretched. Continue reading “Tally Time: Keeping on schedule”

Predicting Forage Growth

By Sandy Johnson, extension beef specialist, Colby, KS

The current drought monitor has much of the southern part of KS in severe or extreme drought, with exceptional drought along the western Oklahoma boarder. It is hard to know how this will change in the coming months but preparation and planning can help us adapt and minimize the impact if dry conditions continue. Continue reading “Predicting Forage Growth”

Water: Questions and Answers

by Justin W. Waggoner, beef systems specialist, Garden City

Most cattle producers fully understand the importance of water. After all, providing an adequate supply of clean, fresh, water is the cornerstone of animal husbandry. There are very few things that compare to the feeling of finding thirsty cows grouped around a dry tank on hot day. Water is important, and in situations where the water supply is limited or we are forced to haul water, one of the first questions we find ourselves asking is “how much water do those cows need”? Continue reading “Water: Questions and Answers”

Forage analysis: What Numbers Do I Need

By Justin Waggoner, Beef Systems Specialist

One the more common questions I receive with regard to analytical testing of forages and other feedstuffs is, “I have the sample, now what do I test for or what analysis package should I select?”

The basic components that nutritionists need to evaluate a feedstuff or develop a ration are dry matter or moisture, crude protein, an estimate of the energy content of the feedstuff — Total Digestible Nutrients (TDN), Net Energy for Maintenance (NEm), Net Energy for gain (NEg), and the macro minerals, Calcium and Phosphorous. These are the most basic numbers that are required but including some additional analyses in the report can give us additional insight into the quality of the feedstuff or improve our ability to predict animal performance, which is the primary reason we analyze feedstuffs.

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A System Approach to Cattle Handling Facility Design

 

By A.J. Tarpoff, Beef Extension Veterinarian

Cattle handling facilities are an excellent investment for the future of an operation. A well designed handling facility allows the operator to work more efficiently saving time and reducing animal (and handler) stress. Design planning must incorporate an operation’s needs, available space, and budget to create a functional system.

Many designs available from purchased books or the internet focus on a single portion of the facility system. An example of this would be either a tub design or a Bud box design.

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