Beef Tips

Tag: artificial insemination

Access workshop materials from Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle meeting

Beef Reproduction Task Force LogoOver 200 cattlemen, industry representatives and academia interested in increasing the reproductive efficiency of beef cattle gathered at the Ruidoso Convention Center, Ruidoso, N.M., for the 2018 Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle symposium Aug. 29-30.

The newsroom at the meeting website (appliedreprostrategies.com) provides summaries of the presentations, proceedings, audio and slides from the various speakers.  Each presentation was shared via Facebook live on the Beef Reproduction Task Force Facebook page and the Angus Journal’s Facebook page.  Take advantage of these great resources to sharpen your skills on your own time schedule.

Tally Time – Determine Estrous Response to Optimize Artificial Insemination Expenses

by Sandy Johnson, Extension Beef Specialist, Colby, KS

For an increasing number of producers, artificial insemination (AI) and estrus synchronization are tools that help them reach their production goals and allow them to take advantage of genetic choices only available through AI.  Reduced risk of calving difficulty from use of high accuracy calving ease sires on replacement heifers is a great advantage to AI users.

Fixed-time AI protocols have allowed producers to eliminate the time and expense of heat detection and still achieve industry-acceptable pregnancy rates to AI.  However, information about estrous status at AI may allow producers to target expenditures for AI more effectively.  While this may seem hard to understand coming from someone who has spent years talking about fixed-time AI, let me share some research that will explain further. Continue reading “Tally Time – Determine Estrous Response to Optimize Artificial Insemination Expenses”

How many natural service sires are needed after estrous synchronization?

By Sandy Johnson, extension beef specialist

More and more producers are taking advantage of opportunities to incorporate targeted, high accuracy genetics using artificial insemination (AI) and estrous synchronization.  While some may AI for two heat cycles, a majority will follow one round of AI with natural service bulls for the remainder of the breeding season.   This brings up the question of how many bulls are needed for the remainder of the breeding season following an estrous synchronization program.  If the AI program is successful, there should be correspondingly fewer females yet to be bred and fewer natural service sires needed  However, some are concerned more bulls are needed to cover the subsequent cycle since return heats will be synchronized from the prior treatment.

Continue reading “How many natural service sires are needed after estrous synchronization?”