Beef Tips

Tag: KSUBeef.org

Limit-feeding high-energy diets based on fermentable fiber for weaned and newly arrived calves offers numerous advantages

by Dale Blasi, Extension Livestock Specialist, and T.J. Spore

 

Many producers have used limit- or programmed-feeding in the past with success, especially during periods of drought when forage is not adequate. In a nutshell, limit- or program-feeding refers to the practice of limiting calves to two-thirds to three-quarters of the dry matter that they can normally consume. This feeding strategy varies greatly with traditional management where calves generally have free-choice access to forage.  Traditionally, limit-fed diets have consisted of 80 to 85% whole shelled corn and the remaining balance as a protein supplement. The total amount of the ration delivered is increased every two weeks or so to account for increased body weight gain based upon the desired level of gain.

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K-State Beef Stocker Field Day scheduled for September 21

The beef cattle outlook, early stocking strategies for optimized marketing and a panel discussion on how cover crops have helped producers improve their operations are among topics planned for the 2017 Kansas State University Beef Stocker Field Day on Thursday, Sept. 21.

The day is designed to provide the latest practical information for producers to aid decision making in the current dynamic beef industry environment.  “There will be applied information presented that attendees can apply to their operation,” says Dale Blasi, K-State Animal Sciences and Industry professor and extension specialist.

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Houser Named Extension Meat Specialist

Dr. Terry Houser has recently acquired the role of Extension Meat Specialist in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry at Kansas State University.  Terry joined Kansas State in 2007 and is currently an Associate Professor.

Terry was born and raised on an irrigated farming/ranching/feedlot operation near Cambridge, Nebraska. He received his B.S. in Animal Science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Meat Science from Iowa State University.

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Late Season Fly Control

By A.J. Tarpoff, DVM, MS, extension veterinarian

Horn flies are blood feeding flies that impact production on cattle operations. Populations of these flies tend to peak in June. The hot dry days of summer tend to decrease the overall population. However, in late August to September as the temperatures begins to decrease and humidity increases, the horn fly population tends to peak again. Continue reading “Late Season Fly Control”

Manure Utilization – Capture the value

by Joel DeRouchey, Extension Livestock Specialist

With fall season approaching, many livestock producers will be applying solid manure to fields post-harvest.  Manure from livestock producers, both large and small, is recognized as a valuable fertilizer source.  However, it certainly involves needed equipment and labor often above that needed to apply commercial sources when considering the scraping, hauling, spreading and potential tillage incorporation into the soil. All sharp penciled livestock producers understand with the dramatic shift in fertilizer prices for nitrogen and phosphorus, the value of manure has never been higher and more economical to use as fertilizer.  With overall input costs soaring, livestock producers must utilize their manure effectively in their cropping operations and or in merchandising the manure as a potential revenue stream.

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Cull Cows; a disappointing failure or marketing opportunity

by Justin W. Waggoner, beef systems specialist

Most cattle operators view open cows, with some degree of disappointment. However, you might be surprised at the amount of revenue that can be realized from cull cow sales. Continue reading “Cull Cows; a disappointing failure or marketing opportunity”

Toe abscesses in feedlot cattle

By A.J. Tarpoff, DVM, MS, extension veterinarian

Lameness is a significant disease challenge in feedlot cattle. It has been estimated that 16% of all treatments, 5% of deaths, and 70% of animals for railer slaughter is due to lameness. One cause of lameness that often goes underdiagnosed is toe abscesses. This issue goes by a number of different names such as toe tip necrosis or P3 (third phalangeal bone) necrosis. It can affect heifers, steers, calves, and yearlings. They typically occur and present during the first 3 weeks after arrival into the feedlot. Toe abscesses can occur on any foot, but tend to be more common on the rear feet. Continue reading “Toe abscesses in feedlot cattle”

Nitrates – what we know and where we need to go

Nitrate toxicity is a well-known metabolic issue in cattle associated with the amount of nitrate in the feed and water; however, it is a complex issue, especially in regards to grazing green forages.  Once consumed by cattle, nitrates enter the rumen where microbes convert nitrate to nitrite in a rapid manner.  Other microbes convert nitrite to ammonia, but at a much slower rate than those converting nitrate to nitrite. This rapid accumulation of nitrite in the rumen is then absorbed into the bloodstream, where nitrite binds with hemoglobin to form methemoglobin, thus reducing the oxygen-carrying capacity of the animal.  As methemoglobin increases, symptoms of nitrate toxicity become worse.  At low levels of methemoglobin dry matter intake and performance can be stunted.  At moderate levels of methemoglobin, pregnant animals will abort.  At high levels of methemoglobin incoordination and death can occur. Continue reading “Nitrates – what we know and where we need to go”

Tally Time – Get more value from pregnancy diagnosis

By Sandy Johnson, extension beef specialist

We just finished preg checking some replacement heifers from a project conducted earlier this spring.  The heifers were all artificially inseminated (AI) at a single fixed-time.  Natural service sires were turned in 10 days after AI and removed 20 days later.  This short breeding season was used for a number of reasons but most importantly so that there would be no late calving replacement females.  The staging of this ultrasound examination was such that we had pregnancies at either 64 days or 54 to 34 days.  Differentiating these stages of pregnancy with ultrasound was relatively easy and the information obtained was very powerful.  The open heifers were sorted off and hauled to the feedlot that day. Continue reading “Tally Time – Get more value from pregnancy diagnosis”

Forage response to fire intensity and time of burning

controlled burn

By Walt Fick, range management specialist

How does fire intensity impact plant response?  Fire intensity varies with the amount of vegetation to burn, moisture content of the vegetation, and weather conditions at the time of burning.  Last year was a good forage production year across most of Kansas, consequently there was plenty of plant material to burn in 2017.

The National Weather Service started issuing Red Flag Warnings back in February.  A Red Flag Warning indicates good conditions for extreme fire behavior.  This usually means relative humidity < 25%, wind speeds > 15 mph with frequent gusts > 25 mph, warm air temperatures e.g. >75oF, and 10-hour dead fuel moisture < 9%. Prescribed burning should not be conducted during a Red Flag Warning.

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