Harvey County

Tag: Agriculture

Double Crop Pig Weed Control

Getting good control of Palmer amaranth and common waterhemp in Kansas has become more of a challenge in recent years. Many populations are now resistant to either glyphosate, triazine, ALS-inhibitor herbicides, HPPD-inhibitor herbicides, PPO-inhibitor herbicides – or a combination of those modes of action. As wheat harvest approaches over the next few weeks in Kansas, producers should plan now for good weed control ahead of double crop soybean.

There are several ways producers can try to manage pigweeds in double crop soybeans. However, all of them involve higher costs than in the past when one or two postemergence applications of glyphosate could control pigweeds in double crop Roundup Ready soybeans. It is common for pigweed to emerge from the early spring through late summer. Because of the ecology of the winter wheat crop, a higher percentage of pigweed emergence can occur a bit later in the season than on fields where wheat is not growing. This can put additional pigweed pressure on double crop soybean. Continue reading “Double Crop Pig Weed Control”

Wheat Survey

The Wheat Production Group at Kansas State University has joined forces with the Kansas Wheat Commission to learn from wheat producers around Kansas. We are conducting a wheat management survey across several fields around the state so we can analyze and evaluate the collected data later in order to develop best management practices for different regions around the state.

On-farm research surveys are different than a typical controlled research experiment as they collect management strategies which a producer has adopted on their individual fields. The main objective of this project is to collect field-level information about wheat management for hundreds of wheat fields around Kansas so we can learn about the most successful management practices adopted for each region. We are currently collecting data from the past two growing seasons (2015-16 and 2016-17), and from 2017-18 in the near future. Continue reading “Wheat Survey”

Buckbrush Control

Buckbrush (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus), also known as coralberry, is a native perennial shrub found in the eastern two-thirds of Kansas. The plant grows in open pastures and woodlands. It sends out “runners” and produces a red fruit in the fall. A related species, western snowberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis), is found primarily in northcentral and northwest Kansas, and produces a white fruit.

Buckbrush is generally considered an undesirable plant in areas being grazed by cattle. Some birds and small mammals use buckbrush patches for cover and nesting. Buckbrush can form dense patches or colonies that shade out more desirable species used for grazing. Top growth removal of buckbrush after the plants have leafed out and the nonstructural carbohydrates stored in the roots are at a low level can be an effective control. One way to accomplish top growth removal is with prescribed burning. Fire can be an effective control technique if burning is done in the late spring. It may take 2 or 3 years of consecutive burning to reduce buckbrush stands. If you missed the opportunity to burn this year or are located in areas where burning wasn’t possible, mowing is an option. Again, it may take 2 or 3 years of consecutive mowing at the proper time (generally early to mid-May) to reduce stands.

Herbicides can also be used to control buckbrush. The best time to spray occurs just as the leaves are starting to change from a light to dark green color. This timing corresponds with the low point in the nonstructural carbohydrate cycle. A number of herbicides can be used to spray buckbrush, but 2,4-D low-volatile ester formulations at 1.5 to 2 lbs./acre are usually quite effective. If you are simultaneously trying to control other species, such as musk thistle, consider Chaparral (aminopyralid + metsulfuron) or Grazon P+D (picloram + 2,4-D). Chaparral can be used alone at 2 to 3 oz./acre for buckbrush control, but I prefer adding 2 pint/acre of 2,4-D to 2 oz./acre Chaparral. Grazon P+D applied at 2-3 pints/acre will provide acceptable control of both buckbrush and musk thistle. Caution should be used if treating cool-season grasses with Chaparral. Grazon P+D is a restricted use pesticide. Always read the label when considering the use of herbicides.

Online Dicamba Training

The Kansas Department of Agriculture has announced that they will be accepting the label required Dicamba specific training online in the State of Kansas starting April 1 for the dicamba products approved for use on Xtend crops.

KDA has stipulated that the online training must have accountability built in to ensure that an individual must participate in the training module.  On-line training is offered by some of the surrounding states, as well as from Monsanto, BASF, and Dow DuPont.

Below are links to the company websites for additional information about application requirements and dicamba training:

Monsanto:   http://www.roundupreadyxtend.com/

BASF:  https://www.engeniastewardship.com/#/training

Dow DuPont (Corteva):  http://www.dupont.com/products-and-services/crop-protection/soybean-protection/articles/fexapan-application.html

If you have any further questions please feel free to contact me at my office. My office number is 316-284-6930 or email is flaming@ksu.edu.

Buck Brush Control

Buckbrush (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus), also known as coralberry, is a native perennial shrub found in the eastern two-thirds of Kansas. The plant grows in open pastures and woodlands. It sends out “runners” and produces a red fruit in the fall. A related species, western snowberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis), is found primarily in northcentral and northwest Kansas, and produces a white fruit.

Buckbrush is generally considered an undesirable plant in areas being grazed by cattle. Some birds and small mammals use buckbrush patches for cover and nesting. Buckbrush can form dense patches or colonies that shade out more desirable species used for grazing. Top growth removal of buckbrush after the plants have leafed out and the nonstructural carbohydrates stored in the roots are at a low level can be an effective control. One way to accomplish top growth removal is with prescribed burning. Fire can be an effective control technique if burning is done in the late spring. It may take 2 or 3 years of consecutive burning to reduce buckbrush stands. If you missed the opportunity to burn this year or are located in areas where burning wasn’t possible, mowing is an option. Again, it may take 2 or 3 years of consecutive mowing at the proper time (generally early to mid-May) to reduce stands.

Herbicides can also be used to control buckbrush. The best time to spray occurs just as the leaves are starting to change from a light to dark green color. This timing corresponds with the low point in the nonstructural carbohydrate cycle. A number of herbicides can be used to spray buckbrush, but 2,4-D low-volatile ester formulations at 1.5 to 2 lbs./acre are usually quite effective. If you are simultaneously trying to control other species, such as musk thistle, consider Chaparral (aminopyralid + metsulfuron) or Grazon P+D (picloram + 2,4-D). Chaparral can be used alone at 2 to 3 oz./acre for buckbrush control, but I prefer adding 2 pint/acre of 2,4-D to 2 oz./acre Chaparral. Grazon P+D applied at 2-3 pints/acre will provide acceptable control of both buckbrush and musk thistle. Caution should be used if treating cool-season grasses with Chaparral. Grazon P+D is a restricted use pesticide. Always read the label when considering the use of herbicides.

Chloride as Top Dressing Nutrient for Wheat

Chloride (Cl) is a highly mobile nutrient in soils and topdressing is typically a good time for application, especially in regions with sufficient precipitation or with coarse-textured soils are prone to leaching. One of the main benefits from good Cl nutrition is the improvement in overall disease resistance in wheat. Wheat response to Cl is usually expressed in improved color, suppression of fungal diseases, and increased yield. It is difficult to predict whether Cl would significantly increase wheat yields unless there has been a recent soil test analysis for this nutrient. Chloride fertilization based on soil testing is becoming more common in Kansas. Continue reading “Chloride as Top Dressing Nutrient for Wheat”

Farming SUCCESSion Conference

Join us for The Key to Farming SUCCESSion Conference on March 20th from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM featuring Keynote Speaker, Roger McEowen!

Attendees will leave with new knowledge and strategies to grow their business and secure farm assets for future generations to come. $40 Registration Fee for First Individual, $30 Registration Fee for Additional Family Members or Students. Registration includes: Conference, Resource Notebook, Lunch, Refreshments. Registration is due ASAP. Payment is due to the McPherson County Extension Office at 600 W. Woodside, McPherson KS 67460 on or before March 20th.

Online Registration: https://tinyurl.com/KeyToFarmingSUCCESSion2018

(note: more information is at this link)

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