Category: January 2019

New Year’s Resolutions

Do you enjoy making New Year’s Resolutions each year?  If you do, you’re not alone.  The top resolutions usually involve eating healthier, exercising more, saving more money, and focusing on self-care.

Did you know that only about 8% of people actually keep their resolutions?  There are many reasons for this, but the most common reasons are because individuals set too many resolutions or get derailed by small failures.  We have a fantastic solution to this-action planning!

Action plans are weekly goals that are concise and focused on a certain task that you are confident that you will accomplish within that week. Once you have succeeded with that weekly goal and have a win under your belt you then have the confidence to build on this and achieve more!

Parts of an Action Plan:

1:  Something you want to do. The first step is to choose something you want to do!  Your action plan won’t work if you are choosing something someone else wants you to do.  You have to WANT to do it!

2:  Make it achievable. Choose an action that you can accomplish this week.

3:  Action specific.  A true action plan is behavior specific.  Losing weight is not a behavior, but not snacking between meals is. Make sure your action plan answers these questions.

  • What? (specific action)
  • How much? (time, distance, amount)
  • When? (time of day, or which days of the week that you will perform the task)
  • How often? ( # of days in week)

4:  Confidence Level of 7 or more.  On a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 represents little confidence and 10 represents total confidence, your plan should rank at least a 7. If you go through your action plan and your confidence level is lower than a 7, go through and see what you can change in your plan to boost your confidence.

An example of an action plan for someone wanting to eat more fruits and vegetables is:

“I will eat at least one fruit or vegetable serving at breakfast, lunch, and supper 5 days this week during those meals. Confidence level: 8.”

If you would like assistance developing your own action plan for success, please contact Ashley at asvaty@ksu.edu

Ashley and Nora will go Live on Facebook January 2ndLike and Follow our Post Rock Extension Facebook page to interact with us and focus on your new year goals!

Action Planning, Goals, New Year

By:  Ashley Svaty

Extension Master Gardener Program

Do you have winter blues and miss your garden? If you have a passion for plants and the outdoors, consider joining the Extension Master Gardener Program. With this fun program you will receive a mini horticulture degree and be able to give back to your community. Contact Cassie Homan at your local Extension Office for more details.

To learn more and fill out an application click this link;

http://www.postrock.k-state.edu/lawn-garden/master-gardner/index.html

By: Cassie Homan

Better Brains for Babies Train-the-Trainer ─ Coming to Beloit!

Train-the-Trainer Experience for Early Childhood Professionals

February 27, 2019 in Beloit, KS

Complete details at www.postrock.k-state.edu

Register by February 20th!

The mission of the Better Brains for Babies initiative is to improve the potential of young children by promoting the use of early brain development research in everyday life experiences. Better Brains for Babies is a collaboration of national, state and local, public and private organizations dedicated to promoting awareness and education about the importance of early brain development in the healthy growth and development of infants and young children. The initiative began in Georgia, and has become available to Kansas professionals through a partnership between University of Georgia Extension and K-State Research and Extension.

Train-the-trainer participants will learn about brain development, adult-child interactions, toxic stress, and other elements of young child development. After completing the training, attendees will be eligible to disseminate information on early brain development throughout their communities. The Better Brains for Babies curriculum is a tool which provides a clear and consistent science-based message about the impact of early brain development on children’s overall growth and development. To learn more, visit www.bbbgeorgia.org.

By:  Nora Rhoades

Walk Kansas

Walk Kansas 2019 will be held from March 17th – May 11th. The goal of this motivating health initiative is to help you and others lead a healthier life. Join this program to become more active with family and friends, make better nutrition choices, and walk away stress. What a great way to kick off the new year!

The Poker Walks last year were such a great success that we are planning to hold a couple throughout the district again! Be sure to watch for registration information mid-February, you don’t want to miss out on the fun and prizes!

For more information about this motivating health program visit http://www.walkkansas.org/ or email Ashley at asvaty@ksu.edu

By:  Ashley Svaty

Forcing Bulbs in Winter

Bulbs made to flower at other than normal times are said to be forced. The practice of forcing is commonly used to flower daffodils, hyacinths, tulips, crocus and other spring bulbs during the winter. This is a fun activity to do in the winter, to create beautiful blooms in your home over the cold months ahead.

To learn more, watch our latest YouTube Video: https://youtu.be/hSLkEN5fzKU

By: Cassie Homan

Handling Recalled Food

Food recalls happen almost daily and many do not get a lot of publicity. In a majority of recalls, it is the manufacturer that issues a voluntary recall.

Manufacturers will work with the FDA or USDA to help determine the reason for the recall and to fix the issue. If foodborne illnesses have occurred, the CDC and state health departments will also be involved.

As consumers, it is important to pay attention to recalls to eliminate the chance of getting sick. Recall announcements give specific information about the food recall including the type of food, brand, package size, date codes, manufacturer codes, shelf life dates, distribution locations, and other pertinent information.

If you have a recalled food, take it back to where it was purchased for a refund, or throw it away. Do not take the chance of eating it or feeding it to animals.

Learn more at www.foodsafety.gov/recalls/index.html.

By:  Ashley Svaty