Category: March 2018

Walk Kansas Registration Deadline March 12th

Walk Kansas is an 8-week health initiative that encourages individuals and teams to reach health goals. Participants receive a weekly newsletter which includes articles about health, exercises, tips, and nutritious recipes.

This year Walk Kansas is specifically focusing on the importance of stretching and will include an optional pre/post fitness assessment for participants to measure their improvement over the 8-weeks.

Participants log minutes of moderate or vigorous activity daily and report online or to a team captain. Activities besides walking such as strengthening exercises, yoga, bike riding, team sports and others count toward Walk Kansas minutes. Teammates do not have to walk or exercise together, but are encouraged to connect and support each other, which is made easy through the online Walk Kansas system.

The 2018 Challenges:

  • 8 Wonders Challenge: Each team member has a goal to log 2.5 hours of moderate to vigorous activity per week. Collectively the team would walk 435 miles over the 8-week program. This trail is featured in Marci Penner’s 8 Wonders of Kansas Guidebook.
  • Cross Country Challenge: Each team member logs 4 hours of activity per week which would take the team on a 764 mile trail over the span of the program.
  • Little Balkans to Nicodemus Challenge: 1,200 mile Kansas trail, with each team member logging 6 hours of moderate-to-vigorous activity each week.

For Post Rock District Walk Kansas participants, the program cost begins at $8. T-Shirts can be purchased at an additional cost. This year will have many giveaways including a few 8 Wonders of Kansas books, Walk Kansas ¾ sleeve t-shirts, hoodies, and more! Poker walks will also be happening across the district so be sure to join in on the fun! Join our Post Rock District Walk Kansas group on Facebook to learn more about Walk Kansas. Participants will have the opportunity to earn 4 Health Quest credits upon completion of the program.

Register today at any Post Rock District office or at www.walkkansasonline.org!

By:  Ashley Svaty

Are you ready for severe weather and emergencies?

The lion of winter and the lamb of spring often play hide-and-go-seek throughout the month of March making diverse Kansas weather threats hard to predict. The area’s common weather threats include tornadoes, thunderstorms, blizzards, and floods along with extreme heat, cold, and wind. Other emergencies your family may confront could relate to vehicle trouble, medical concerns, fires, and accidents.

Severe weather and emergencies can strike at any moment and will likely affect every family at some point. The best way to work through difficult situations and circumstances is to be prepared before a concern presents itself. It is recommended that every household and family have an emergency plan that is reviewed and practiced at least 2 times each year. In regards to your plan, here are some things to consider:

  • What emergencies could affect my family where we live, work, learn, and play?
  • What special needs (infant, elderly, medical, disability) does my family have?
  • What are each individual’s responsibilities? How will we work together as a team?
  • How will we be alerted and warned (tv, wireless alerts, radio) about potential hazards?
  • Identify a place to meet if separated and the route to get there. How will you shelter-in-place? Where can you shelter away from home?
  • Identify local and out-of-area ‘In Case of Emergency’ contacts. It is a good idea to clearly identify these contacts in your phone and in a wallet or purse.
  • Assemble a basic emergency supply kit and place it somewhere that will be easy to access. Try to include enough supplies to last a minimum of 3 days.

By:  Nora Rhoades

Lawn Calendar for Warm-Season Grass

Warm seasons grasses include Bermudagrass, Buffalograss, and Zoysiagrass they require special care to survive our hot and dry summers. Year round attention is needed to keep the weeds down and help your grass look green and lush. Follow this DIY calendar to care for your lawn each month.

View the whole article for even more tips;

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/homeowner-do-it-yourself-lawn-calendar-for-warm-season-grass/

By: Cassie Homan

Learn Tools for Better Health

If you are living with an ongoing health condition (such as arthritis, asthma, diabetes, high blood pressure, or depression) or you are a caregiver of someone who does, this is for you! Living with Chronic Conditions workshops are interactive learning opportunities that teach techniques to manage common symptoms.

FREE workshop series led by trained leaders to help you:

  • Learn decision-making and problem solving skills
  • Communicate effectively with family, friends and health professionals
  • Manage fatigue
  • Learn new ways to eat healthy
  • Control pain
  • Increase physical activity
  • Set and accomplish Goals
  • Deal with anger, depression, and difficult emotions
  • Better manage your health

This 6-week workshop will be offered in two locations on Tuesdays March 20th-April 24th:

9:30am Lincoln Senior Center
Contact Lincoln County Health Department at (784) 524-4406
Registration deadline is March 15th, 2018

2pm Smith Center Senior Center
Contact Smith County Health Department at 785-282-6656.
Registration deadline is March 9th, 2018

By:  Ashley Svaty

Pruning Fruit Trees

If you have fruit trees, now is the time to prune them before the trees break dormancy. Fruit trees can be pruned through March as long as the wood isn’t frozen.

Pruning is important to maintain a functional structure of the tree and to keep the tree healthy. Pruning helps develop strong tree structure, increase sunlight penetration through the canopy, and control the size of the tree.

Watch this video tutorial to prune your trees:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbKR4oE6Ylc&index=3&list=PL8AF47942719DD5BD

By: Cassie Homan

The Key to Farming SUCCESSion Conference

March 20, 2018 │ Newton, KS

Join us for The Key to Farming SUCCESSion Conference on March 20th from 10:00AM-4:00PM. The conference will feature keynote speaker, Roger McEowen! Featured breakout session topics include:  Advanced Health Care Planning; Where Do I Start?; Preparing for the What If; Estate Planning 101; New Tax Laws; and Navigating Family Differences. Attendees will leave with new knowledge and strategies to grow their business and secure farm assets for future generations to come.

Event information is available at http://www.harvey.k-state.edu/agriculture/

View the event flier at http://bit.ly/2FbVevO

By:  Nora Rhoades

Join the Post Rock District Walk Kansas Facebook Group!

If you’re looking to stay in the know and up to date on all of the upcoming Walk Kansas events, join the Post Rock District Walk Kansas Facebook Group! This group will share health tips to keep you motivated throughout the challenge and will also offer opportunities for you to win prizes! Click here to join the Post Rock District Walk Kansas Group!

By:  Ashley Svaty

Post Rock Extension District Advisory Conversations

Join the Post Rock District’s Extension Agents as we explore the strengths and weaknesses faced by our communities, families, businesses and youth.  The insight gained will play a valuable role in Extension’s ability to initiate and maintain research-based programs and services to support satisfying lifestyles and healthy communities.

Please RSVP one day prior to the conversation you plan to attend.

  • Beloit Office:  April 5th, 10:00‒11:00am
    115 S. Hersey Beloit, KS 67420 (785) 738-3597
  • Lincoln Office:  April 5th, 1:30‒2:30pm
    216 E. Lincoln Lincoln, KS 67455 (785) 524-4432
  • Mankato Office:  April 6th, 10:00‒11:00am
    307 N. Commercial Mankato, KS 66956 (785) 378-3174
  • Smith Center Office:  April 6th, 1:30‒2:30pm
    218 S. Grant Smith Center, KS 66967 (785) 282-6823
  • Osborne Office:  April 12th, 10:00‒11:00am
    113 N. 1st Street Osborne, KS 67473 (785) 346-2521
  • Virtual Meeting:  April 12th, 1:30‒2:30pm
    Meeting connection information will be shared with RSVPs

By:  Nora Rhoades

Annuals That Will Pop

If you have been disappointed by your annual flower beds or containers in past seasons, try our tested varieties. K-State has tested annual and perennial flowers for many years to find the best of the best. These colorful blooms are sure to stand up in our summer heat, and hot winds. Use the Prairie Star website as a shopping list when picking out your flowers this spring.

Prairie Star Annuals and Prairie Bloom Perennials Website:

http://www.prairiestarflowers.com/

By: Cassie Homan

You Asked It!

The following topics are discussed in full in the March issue of You Asked It! The E-newsletter can be accessed here.

  • What is the Keto Diet?
  • Using Pyrex® in Pressure Cookers
  • Homemade Play Dough Safety
  • Incubator Kitchens for Food Businesses
  • Walnut Syrup and Birch Syrup
  • Science and Our Food Supply Curriculum
  • Keep the Beat™ Recipes
  • Home Baking Association Educator Award
  • Kansas Nutrition Council Conference
  • 2018 Urban Food Systems Symposium

By:  Ashley Svaty

The Money That You Keep

For far too many of us, the money we earn is spent almost as soon as we make it. For those managing burdens of debt, it could be argued that the money we earn is already spent before we earn it.

But what if you could pay yourself first, and keep some of those earnings for things you need today, or might need tomorrow?

“We know that Americans for several years — actually some decades, probably — have not saved as much as Americans in the past,” said Elizabeth Kiss, a family resource management specialist for K-State Research and Extension.

America Saves (americasaves.org) provides a list of strategies to help individuals and families grow their nest egg, rather than scramble their finances.

Start With A Plan — The old adage is true: Those who fail to plan, plan to fail. Saving money requires some thought, and a plan of action. “Looking at your goals, think about how much money you need, how much you can realistically put aside on a regular basis, and that’s the plan part,” Kiss says. “Without a plan we’re just kind of maneuvering without full information, without direction.”

Automate The Process — Most wage earners are paid by direct deposit. It might be possible to have your paycheck deposited into two or more different accounts, designating one of those accounts for savings. “If you don’t see that money in your checking account, it was never really there, you don’t miss it. And hopefully you’ll think twice before taking it out of savings,” says Kiss.

These things take practice, so don’t be surprised if it takes two or more attempts at finding just the right amount to be set aside — an amount that will still leave you enough for regular expenses.

Expect the Unexpected — Things happen. The car needs a repair, the dishwasher breaks down, your kid knocks a glass of water onto your phone. Saving for those “rainy day” eventualities takes some of the sting out of those surprises when (not “if”) they happen. Kiss advises that health expenses should probably have their own separate column or account, away from the Rainy Day Fund. “Health expenses are a little bit different, so money for deductibles and co-pays should probably keep that money separate from the Rainy Day Fund,” she says.

Saving Shouldn’t Be Boring — We all need to unwind, whether it’s a night at the movies or a weekend at the beach. A good savings plan should have some fun, some discretionary money built into it. “If you’re meeting your basic needs and all of your financial responsibilities, and putting some aside for the future, there’s no reason not to have some fun money, too,” says Kiss.

Saving to Stop Working — Things like Social Security and pension plans can only cover so much. If you plan to stop working in your later years, you’ll need to plan today, for tomorrow. Some employers match contributions to a retirement plan, Kiss says, and that could be the biggest wrench in your toolkit. “If you need to put in a certain amount to get the maximum match from your employer, that’s the ‘free money’ — that’s the no brainer. Do everything you can to put in what you need to, to get the maximum amount of matching funds.”

Save The Extras — Not all of life’s surprises are unpleasant: things like raises at work, tax refunds, gifts and inheritances. Those things don’t necessarily have to be an excuse to splurge. The recent tax reforms signed into law will take effect next year are a good opportunity for savings. “If you see an increase in your actual take home pay, think about putting at least some of that aside for whatever your financial goals are,” Kiss suggests. “Also, consider knocking down any debt you may have, whether its student loans, mortgages, or credit cards.”

Funds For the Whole Family! — Good habits start at home, and they start young. America Saves can help you teach younger members of the family about the importance of saving money and planning ahead. Some might balk at the idea of showing children where all Dad’s money goes, but Kiss says it’s a golden opportunity. “Talking to your children about your savings goals helps them to understand that you can’t always have everything right away. It’s the concepts of deferment, planning and making tradeoffs,” she says. “If the family wants to go on a vacation, ask the kids for ideas to help save money for that. Kids have great ideas and they just might surprise you.”

“If you’re realistic, and start with a small goal, that success can build up,” Kiss says. “One of the organizing principles of America Saves is that when you write it down and then share it with someone, you’re more likely to continue to work toward your goal and to have better success at achieving it.”

By:  Nora Rhoades