Category: May 2018

Watering Your Lawn

Knowing how often and how much to water your lawn can be tricky. With the lack of rain, it may be tempting to over water your grass. However, you can use past weather data from K-State’s Weather Data Library to figure the exact about of Evapotranspiration from your landscape. This will help in knowing how much water has been lost from your lawn and how much needs to be applied. Remember the basic rule of lawn irrigation is to water deeply and infrequently.

Watch this video tutorial to learn more:

By: Cassie Homan

Community Leaders Engage in Critical Community Health Conversations

In a move to create a more prominent “culture of health” in our region, community leaders representing Jewell, Lincoln, Mitchell, Osborne and Smith Counties participated in a series of meetings Kansas State University organized across the state of Kansas.

They had one goal in mind: to make Kansans healthier.

Read more about these conversations, and discover why it is important for our communities to make health and wellness a priority at http://postrockextension.blogspot.com/2018/04/post-rock-district-community-leaders.html

By:  Nora Rhoades

Summer Sun Safety

The kids will be out of school before we know it, which means plenty of time outdoors! Before going outside, make sure you always lather up with sunscreen to protect your skin.  To avoid burns, make sure you wear sunglasses and a wide brimmed hat and seek shade especially between 10am-4pm when UV rays are strongest. Lather up with a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher 30 minutes before outdoor activities and reapply at least every 2 hours. For more information please check out our May Building Strong Families insert found here: https://bit.ly/1ThhOSk

By:  Ashley Svaty

Top 10 Insects in Your Garden

Cassie Homan
Horticulture Agent

Have you ever been in your garden and found a mysterious insect, you weren’t sure what it was or how to control it? This program is for you! Our guest speaker will be State Extension leader for Entomology Dr. Raymond Cloyd. Dr. Cloyd will be talking about the top insects you might see this growing season. Join us Thursday, May 10th at 7:00pm, in the commercial building on the Cloud County Fairgrounds in Concordia, Kansas. This event is brought to you by K-State Research and Extension Horticulture Agents Cassie Homan from Post Rock District and Kelsey Hatesohl from River Valley District. Whether you have been gardening for years or are just getting started this program is open to all at no cost! Participants are asked to RSVP by May 7th to the Post Rock Extension Office at 785-738-3597 or by emailing Kelsey Hatesohl at khatesohl@ksu.edu.

For more details and to register online: https://www.facebook.com/events/638254819850451/

By: Cassie Homan

Raise Your Hand For Kansas Youth – Help 4-H Win $20,000!

In 4-H, we believe in the power of America’s youth to succeed in life; however, only one in three youth say they have the skills they need to handle what life throws their way.

That’s why 4-H created “Raise Your Hand.” A nationwide call to action for alumni and friends to “Raise Your Hand” to empower our nation’s youth with the skills to lead for a lifetime.

The state with the most hands raised will win $20,000 for their local 4-H programs. Help bring high-quality 4-H experiences to even more youth right here in Kansas!

4-H gives youth the opportunity to learn by doing, grow from failure and develop the skills they need to make a difference in their community. We’re asking you, friends and alumni of 4-H, to Raise Your Hand to support 4-H’ers in Kansas!

 

“Voting” is easy – simply go online to www.4-H.org/RaiseYourHand. The contest ends May 15, so Raise Your Hand now and select KANSAS.

By:  Nora Rhoades

Canning Food Safely

Home food preservation is a way to preserve the freshness of homegrown food. While more popular in years past, preserving food at home is still done today. Without factoring in the labor costs, home food preservation can save money compared to commercially preserved foods.

When done properly and safely, home preserved foods are a treat. But when improper practices and unsafe food handling techniques are used, the food can cause foodborne illness. Learn more about this at:

Home Canning and Botulism – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

K-State Research and Extension is a trusted source for your food preservation needs. Karen Blakeslee from the Rapid Response Center has made great informational canning videos that can be viewed here

 

By:  Ashley Svaty

Iris Bacterial Soft Rot

If your irises aren’t looking healthy this year, they may have a condition called bacterial soft rot. The bacteria will cause a smelly and slimy rot of the leaves and rhizomes. Leaves often separate easily from the rhizome. If your plants are heavily infested they may die.

Though most often associated with iris borer, environmental damage can also provide an entry point for this disease.

Rhizomes that show extensive signs of damage should be discarded.  If there is a plant that has special value, you may wish to try to save it. The American Iris Society suggests using a spoon to remove all infected tissue. Then, allow the rhizome to dry in the sun. Finally, use a chlorine based cleanser to powder the wound. Dousing in place with Dial antibacterial soap (with triclosan) can be substituted for the chlorine based cleanser.

When dividing rhizomes from beds that have shown evidence of soft rot, disinfect the knife between cuts of even apparently healthy rhizomes with a 10% bleach solution or rubbing alcohol.

As mentioned previously, iris borer damage can provide a place of entry for this disease. To control iris borers, remove and discard dead leaves in the fall to eliminate a number of the iris borer eggs. Larvae can also be killed by hand in June by squeezing infested leaves in the vicinity of the injury. During division, borers in lightly infested rhizomes can be killed by poking them with a piece of wire. Borer control can also be achieved through the use of imidacloprid (Merit, Bayer All-In-One Rose & Flower Care, Bonide Systemic Granules, Hi-Yield Systemic Insect Granules) or through the use of the parasitic nematodes Steinernema carpocapsae or Heterorhabditis bacteriophora.

By: Cassie Homan

Spend Some, Share Some, Save Some: Family Budgeting

Is your household’s spending, saving, and sharing on track to support your goals and values? It’s time to revisit those guidelines and expectations. K-State Research and Extension has a helpful resource that can assist you as you answer these questions. It is never too late to take a small step toward stronger financial wellness. For additional assistance or to access more resources, contact your local Post Rock District Office.

Spend Some, Share Some, Save Some: Family Budgeting bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/MF3306.pdf

By:  Nora Rhoades

Fertilize Your Plants by Sidedressing

Sidedressing, also referred to as topdressing, is the practice of fertilizing your plants as they are actively growing. This is done using a fertilizer high in nitrogen and gives your plants an extra boost during the growing season. Done correctly, sidedressing can improve vegetable, fruit and flower production.

Use the chart linked below to learn the amount of fertilizer needed, and suggested time of application for your specific crop.

http://tinyurl.com/hxtgres

By: Cassie Homan

Why Family Communication Is Important

We rarely think about our communication with loved ones. However, family communication is very important and determines our relationships with each other, setting the tone for family life. Family communication is not simple. It has many parts. Communication is more than what we say and do. Our messages depend on how we think the other person will react, so we communicate differently with individual members of the family. Each of us has several different communication patterns that develop over time. It depends on who is communicating.

K-State Research and Extension’s, Essential Living Skills: Basic Family Communication is a curriculum that guides participants toward improving everyday communication in their families. This educational program emphasizes skill-building and mindful communication techniques for improving family communication and interaction.

To access the curriculum, visit https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/S134E.pdf. For assistance, using the curriculum to improve your own family communication, and/or to explore ways you might be able to effectively use the curriculum as a teaching tool in a learning environment, contact Nora Rhoades, Family and Youth Development Agent in the Post Rock District.

By:  Nora Rhoades