Tag: Flowers

Horticulture Hot Topics Webinar Series

Educational Seminars:

  • Herbs- From Seed to Seasoning, May 7 at 3:00p.m.
  • Lawn Care Basics for Kansas, May 14 at 3:00p.m.
  • Veggie Gardening 101, May 21 at 7:00p.m.
  • Dealing with the Dreaded Bagworm, May 28 at 7:00p.m.


Learn how to care for your landscape with this free webinar series!

Cassie Homan, Post Rock Horticulture Agent and Kelsey Hatesohl, River Valley Horticulture Agent are hosting an online learning workshop!

Registration-

Pre-registration is required for this FREE online event. Registration is required by 4:00 p.m. the day prior to the webinar. To register email choman@ksu.edu or khatesohl@ksu.edu and you will be sent the Zoom Link.

All webinars will be recorded and made available on our websites.

To download the free Zoom platform visit: https://zoom.us/download

For more details visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/3744893858917261/

By: Cassie Homan

Fertilizing Spring Flowering Bulbs

The best time to fertilize spring-flowering bulbs is when foliage emerges in the spring rather than at flowering. Traditionally, gardeners have applied fertilizer during bloom or a bit after, but because bulb roots start to die at flowering, fertilizer applied at bloom is wasted. Roots are active when the foliage first pokes through the ground.

Nutrients applied then help the plant produce flowers the following year. If bulbs have been fertilized in the past, there are often plenty of phosphorus and potassium in the soil. It is best to use a soil test to be certain. If the soil needs phosphorus and potassium, use a complete fertilizer (such as 10-10-10, 9-9-6, etc.) at the rate of 2.5 lbs. per 100 square feet. This would equal 1 rounded teaspoon per square foot. If phosphorus and potassium are not needed, blood meal makes an excellent fertilizer. It should be applied at the rate of 2 lbs. per 100 square feet or 1 teaspoon per square foot. Lawn fertilizers such as a 27-3-3 or 30-3-3 can be used, but cut the rate by a third. Also make sure the lawn fertilizer does not contain a weed preventer or weed killer.

Remember to leave the foliage until it dies naturally. The energy in the foliage is transferred to the bulb as the foliage dies and will help bloom next year.

By: Cassie Homan

Christmas Plants Brighten the Holiday

Christmas plants such as poinsettias, holiday cactus, and amaryllis bulbs are a fun way to bring some color to the winter months. They like a bright, sunny location in your home and regular watering. With proper care these plants can be kept from year to year for lasting value. For help picking out the perfect poinsettia watch this YouTube Video:

By: Cassie Homan

Time to Bring in Your Containers

Container gardening is so easy and fun! The containers we use are often large and can be quite pricy. Now that winter has arrived it’s important to bring them inside.

Most pots are made out of terra cotta or glazed ceramic. These pots are able to absorb moisture. They then shrink and swell with winter freezing and thawing. This unfortunately causes the pots to break.

Don’t forget to take a few moments this month to clean out your pots and bring them indoors so you can use them again next year!

By: Cassie Homan

Fall Mums

Nature always gives us signals as seasons change. When summer starts to shift toward fall, the leaves begin to change colors. Another sure sign that fall is right around the corner is the arrival of colorful and beautiful fall mums in garden centers.

Now is the time to plan how and where to use these plants effectively around your home and landscape. A newer trend for growers is to mix colors in containers, so be ready for even more decisions.

Watch this video for information on how to get your mums to last through the winter:

By: Cassie Homan

Dividing Peonies in Fall:

Peonies are a favorite perennial of gardeners because of their beauty and low maintenance. In Kansas, peonies provide a beautiful display of flowers each spring around Memorial Day. Though peonies can be left in place indefinitely, many gardeners wish to increase their plantings and use a process known as division to accomplish this. Keep in mind, however, that peonies often take about three years to return to full bloom and size after division.

Fall is the traditional time to divide these plants. Peonies are essentially dormant by mid-August even though the foliage is still green. The first step in division is to remove the foliage. Then dig out the entire plant. Shake and wash off as much soil as possible so that the pink buds or “eyes” are visible. Peony roots are tough, and a sharp knife is needed to cut the roots into separate pieces. Make sure each division has three to four buds. Make sure the location chosen for planting receives at least a half-day of full sun. However, the more sun, the better. Space the plants so that there is at least 2 feet between dwarf types and 4 feet between the standard types.

Follow the same rules for planting these divisions as you do for new plants. Make sure the pink buds are about 1 inch below the soil surface. If they are set more than 2 inches deep, flowering may be delayed or completely prevented. As you set the plants, firm soil often as it is added around the plant. If the soil is not firmed, it can settle and pull the plant down with it. Water in well after planting and water as necessary through the fall and winter to keep the soil moist.

It is often a good idea to add mulch to the new planting to protect it from heaving. The alternate freezing and thawing that commonly occurs during Kansas winters can “heave” weakly rooted plants out of the ground. Add a mulch of straw, leaves, compost or other material after the soil freezes. Remember, it is not the cold that harms these plants but the alternate freezing and thawing of the soil.

By: Cassie Homan