Tag: Food Preservation

Fall Canning Tips

Done canning? Store your equipment with care for next season.

By: Ashley Svaty

The Search for Canning Supplies

Now that gardens are producing, food preservation supplies are disappearing off store shelves. Canning lids are few and far between. But remember, do not reuse canning lids! Do not use old, dented, or deformed lids, or lids with gaps or other defects in the sealing gasket. When jars are processed, the lid gasket softens and flows slightly to cover the jar-sealing surface, yet allows air to escape from the jar. The gasket then forms an airtight seal as the jar cools. Gaskets in unused lids work well for at least 5 years from date of manufacture. The gasket compound in older unused lids may fail to seal on jars.

By: Ashley Svaty

 

Free Online Food Preservation Series

University of Nebraska Extension is hosting a FREE Food Preservation Virtual Learning Series. Each session will include a short presentation and time for discussion and question/answer on any food preservation related topic. All sessions will be taught online through zoom and pre-registration is required. The session details are below:

  • August 5, 6:30 p.m: Food Preservation 101
  • August 19, 6:30 p.m: Boiling Water Canning/Steam Canning/Pressure Canning
  • September 2, 6:30 p.m: Freezing/Dehydrating

Each Zoom session will be recorded and a link to the recording will be sent to all participants who register. Sessions will be led by Nebraska Extension’s Food Preservation Team.

For more information and to register, please follow this link: https://food.unl.edu/article/home-food-preservation-series

By: Ashley Svaty

Electric Multi-Cookers Are Not Canners

Ashley Svaty
Nutrition, Food Safety and Health Agent

Canning season is in full swing and we must remember to only use SAFE and trusted preservation techniques and recipes. It is critical to use scientifically tested recipes when canning and while some electric multi-cookers have a “canning” button, no research is available to back up this function. Use these appliances for cooking only! Find safe and trusted recipes here: https://www.rrc.k-state.edu/preservation/index.html or call any Post Rock District office and we would be happy to help!

By: Ashley Svaty

Preserving Tomatoes

Tomatoes may have that tasty zing that makes them tart and tasty. But in reality, they are not as acidic as they seem, especially when canning tomatoes.

Tomatoes have a pH value around 4.6 which makes them unsafe to can by themselves, with many varieties above 4.6. All tomatoes must be acidified with either citric acid, bottled lemon juice, or vinegar with 5% acidity in both water bath and pressure canning processing.

Without this added acid, tomatoes will likely ferment and spoil. Learn more in Preserve it Fresh, Preserve it Safe: Tomatoes.

By: Ashley Svaty

Let’s Preserve Cherries!

Whether you like them sweet, sour, golden or red, cherries are in season! Their short season means you must enjoy them as much as you can now. But wait! They can also be preserved to save them for a later date.

Cherries can be preserved by canning, freezing, dehydrating, or made into canned pie filling, jam, jelly. The uses of fresh cherries are endless in many meals or just a simple snack.

Freezing is easy. Simply wash, remove stems and pits. Dry and spread on a tray in a single layer to freeze. Then place them in freezer containers. Cherries can also be frozen in a syrup or sugar pack.

If making canned pie filling, use sour cherries for that classic pie flavor. Use Clear Jel® starch (cook type) for best results.

Learn more about preserving cherries at https://bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/MF1180.pdf. To dehydrate cherries, see https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/dry/csu_dry_fruits.pdf.

Please call any of our offices with food preservation questions or visit: https://www.rrc.k-state.edu/preservation/

By: Ashley Svaty

Online Food Preservation Videos and Publications

Looking for ways to learn about food preservation? Videos can help! There are several resources available to help guide you.

From selecting recipes to storage, the process of preserving food safely is in your hands! Start with reliable, tested recipes and follow them exactly. A lot of science goes into food preservation, so using researched recipes is the best choice. Using untested recipes, methods or outdated equipment can lead to spoiled food or foodborne illness.

So let us help! See the video selections at www.rrc.k-state.edu/preservation/videos.html

Many publications are also available at your fingertips! Learn more at www.rrc.k-state.edu/preservation/index.html

Do you pressure can? If so, it’s recommended to have your dial gauge tested annually by the extension office.  Please email Ashley Svaty at asvaty@ksu.edu to discuss a process for testing your gauge to ensure a safe canning season!

By: Ashley Svaty