Tag: Food Preservation

Are you Ready for Canning Season?

Dust off your canner, it’s almost canning season! K-State Research and Extension is a trusted and reliable resource for all your food preservation needs.  It is highly recommended that your dial gauge is tested each year at the extension office to be sure you are canning at the right pressure.  Please call or email Ashley at (785) 524-4432 asvaty@ksu.edu to set up a time to bring your dial gauge in to get checked. Before you begin canning make sure you:

  • Call us with any questions
  • Use the correct equipment
  • Adjust for altitude
  • Only use tested recipes
  • Acidify tomatoes
  • Use proper processing times based on trusted resources
  • Get your dial gauge tested annually
  • Leave proper headspace
  • Use the specific size jar a recipe calls for
  • Do not can in an Electric Pressure Cooker

For more information about canning or preserving your own food please contact any of our Post Rock District offices or go to our K-State Research and Extension Rapid Response Food Preservation website here.

By:  Ashley Svaty

Canning Food Safely

Home food preservation is a way to preserve the freshness of homegrown food. While more popular in years past, preserving food at home is still done today. Without factoring in the labor costs, home food preservation can save money compared to commercially preserved foods.

When done properly and safely, home preserved foods are a treat. But when improper practices and unsafe food handling techniques are used, the food can cause foodborne illness. Learn more about this at:

Home Canning and Botulism – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

K-State Research and Extension is a trusted source for your food preservation needs. Karen Blakeslee from the Rapid Response Center has made great informational canning videos that can be viewed here

 

By:  Ashley Svaty

Canning Previously Frozen Tomatoes

So you saved your tomato crop in the freezer. Can those frozen tomatoes be canned?

It is not recommended to can tomatoes that froze on the vine. This is because the acid content changes too much making them unsafe for canning. But tomatoes harvested prior to a fall freeze, then frozen, do not change in acidity. What does change is their texture and how they measure.

The best choice for canning previously frozen tomatoes is to make a well cooked product such as a stewed or crushed tomato product, or made into tomato juice or sauce.

It is not recommended to can them whole or quartered. They will pack into the jars differently, absorb moisture differently, and the heat transfers through the jars differently. This could lead to underprocessing and spoilage. Tomato canning recipes are based on fresh tomatoes.

Source: University of Georgia

From the December issue of You Asked It!  To access the full issue please click here

By:  Ashley Svaty

Drying Meat Safely

As fall hunting season approaches, there are many ways to preserve the meat. One of those is dehydrating meat jerky.

Optimum drying temperature is 140°F. But, meat must be heated to 160°F to eliminate possible E. coli bacteria. Pick one of these methods for safe jerky.

  • Prior to drying, heat the strips of meat in the marinade by boiling them for 5 minutes, drain, and pat dry. Proceed with dehydrating the meat.
  • After dehydrating the meat, place the jerky on a baking sheet and put into a 275°F oven for 10 minutes.

Learn more at:  www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/MF3173.pdf

By:  Ashley Svaty

Food Preservation Workshop August 9th

Ashley Svaty
Nutrition, Food Safety
and Health Agent

Join us for a full day of hands on food preservation!  This workshop is for beginners and experienced canners who are wanting to brush up on current methods.  Participants will gain experience water bath & pressure canning, preserving their own salsa, vegetables, jams &jellies, and drying herbs!  Lunch will be provided and door prizes will be awarded throughout the day, you won’t want to miss this.

The workshop will be held at the Cawker City United Methodist.  Registration is due August 2nd along with $25 registration fee.  A minimum of 10 participants required to hold the workshop.  Please call (785) 524-4432 for more information.

Food Preservation Workshop flier is available here

By:  Ashley Svaty

August You Asked It!

You Asked It! is a monthly newsletter published each month by the K-State Research and Extension Rapid Response Center. News articles are based on questions received, current food safety issues, or information based on the time of year. Topics featured in the August newsletter include:

    • The Science of Freezing Food
    • Why do home canned green beans get cloudy liquid?
    • Chia Seeds in Jam
    • What is Pearled Barley?
    • Can I add bacon to green beans before canning them?
    • Mayonnaise Mix-Ins!
    • Advancing Awareness of Accident Prevention in the Home
    • Bake for Good: Kids

  • Safety Tips for Handling and Preparing Common Foods
  • It’s Back to School Time!

Enjoy the August newsletter here http://bit.ly/2uyPbMr

By:  Ashley Svaty

Food Preservation Workshop August 9th

Join us for a full day of hands on food preservation!  This workshop is for beginners and experienced canners who are wanting to brush up on current methods.  Participants will gain experience water bath & pressure canning, preserving their own salsa, vegetables, jams &jellies, and drying herbs!  Lunch will be provided and door prizes will be awarded throughout the day, you won’t want to miss this.

The workshop will be held at the Cawker City United Methodist.  Registration is due August 2nd along with $25 registration fee.  A minimum of 10 participants required to hold the workshop.  Please call (785) 524-4432 for more information.

Food Preservation Workshop flier is available here

By:  Ashley Svaty