Tag: Food Safety

Women In Agriculture: Harvest Meals Food Safety

Join Chef Alli and our Nutrition, Food Safety, and Health Agent, Ashley Svaty in Osborne on April 24th at 6pm at the old high school gym. Chef Alli will teach how to plan and prepare harvest meals and Ashley will teach the group how to keep these meals safe when temperatures rise in the fields! Meal will be provided. Fee: $10/person RSVP is requested by Friday, April 13 by calling or stopping by the Osborne County Conservation District Office (1117 W. Hwy. 24), 785-346-2128, Ext. 3.

For more information, visit the event website.

By:  Ashley Svaty

April You Asked It!

In the latest issue of You Asked It! you will find articles on the following topics:

 Freeze-Dried Foods

  • Private Water Well Information
  • Spring Break Food Safety
  • How to Store Honey
  • Long-Term Health Effects of Foodborne Illness
  • Food Preservation Classes Scheduled
  • Explore the NORS Dashboard
  • Keep the Egg Hunt Safe!
  • Add Crunch with Celery!
  • New Items for Food Preservation

 Click here to access the April Issue of You Asked It!

 By:  Ashley Svaty

Holiday Meals

Ashley Svaty
Nutrition, Food Safety
and Health Agent

Did you know that one in six Americans could get sick from food poisoning this year alone? Keep your family safe this holiday season by following the 4 steps to safe food:  Separate, Clean, Cook, and Chill.

Separate raw from ready to eat foods. Keep meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs separate from all other foods starting at the grocery store and continue through preparation.  Prevent cross contamination by using separate cutting boards for raw meat and ready to eat foods.

Clean hands often. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends to wash hands for 20 seconds with soap and water before and after preparing food, after touching raw meat, raw eggs, or unwashed vegetables, and before eating or drinking.

Cook food to safe internal temperatures. ALWAYS use a food thermometer, do not judge doneness of food by color.

  • Cook beef, pork, lamb, steaks, and roasts to 145°F with 3-minute rest time.
  • Cook Fish to 145° F
  • Cook ground beef, pork, veal, lamb to 160° F
  • Cook all poultry to 165° F.
  • Reheat leftovers to 165° F

Chill leftovers within 2 hours. Bacteria grows rapidly at room temperature, do not let food sit out.  When storing leftovers in the refrigerator, use shallow pans or containers to decrease cooling time. This prevents the food from spending too much time at unsafe temperatures (between 40 °F to 140 °F). Keep leftovers in a cooler with ice or frozen gel packs if food is traveling home with guests. Eat leftovers within 4 days or store in your freezer.

For more information please visit www.foodsafety.gov

By:  Ashley Svaty

You Asked It!

Karen Blakeslee from the K-State Rapid Response Center publishes this newsletter each month and bases articles on questions received, current food safety issues, or timely information. The topics found in the current issue are found below and the entire November You Asked It! E-Newsletter can be found here.

  • Cooking Dry Beans Safely
  • Adding Lavender to Food
  • Cooking Class and Baking Class for Kids
  • Myths about the Alkaline Diet
  • Freezing Yeast Dough
  • Tips & Trick for Dental Health
  • Low Oxalate Spinach
  • The Holidays!
  • What is Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

By:  Ashley Svaty

Drying Meat Safely

As fall hunting season approaches, there are many ways to preserve the meat. One of those is dehydrating meat jerky.

Optimum drying temperature is 140°F. But, meat must be heated to 160°F to eliminate possible E. coli bacteria. Pick one of these methods for safe jerky.

  • Prior to drying, heat the strips of meat in the marinade by boiling them for 5 minutes, drain, and pat dry. Proceed with dehydrating the meat.
  • After dehydrating the meat, place the jerky on a baking sheet and put into a 275°F oven for 10 minutes.

Learn more at:  www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/MF3173.pdf

By:  Ashley Svaty

Food Preservation Workshop August 9th

Ashley Svaty
Nutrition, Food Safety
and Health Agent

Join us for a full day of hands on food preservation!  This workshop is for beginners and experienced canners who are wanting to brush up on current methods.  Participants will gain experience water bath & pressure canning, preserving their own salsa, vegetables, jams &jellies, and drying herbs!  Lunch will be provided and door prizes will be awarded throughout the day, you won’t want to miss this.

The workshop will be held at the Cawker City United Methodist.  Registration is due August 2nd along with $25 registration fee.  A minimum of 10 participants required to hold the workshop.  Please call (785) 524-4432 for more information.

Food Preservation Workshop flier is available here

By:  Ashley Svaty

Food Preservation Workshop August 9th

Join us for a full day of hands on food preservation!  This workshop is for beginners and experienced canners who are wanting to brush up on current methods.  Participants will gain experience water bath & pressure canning, preserving their own salsa, vegetables, jams &jellies, and drying herbs!  Lunch will be provided and door prizes will be awarded throughout the day, you won’t want to miss this.

The workshop will be held at the Cawker City United Methodist.  Registration is due August 2nd along with $25 registration fee.  A minimum of 10 participants required to hold the workshop.  Please call (785) 524-4432 for more information.

Food Preservation Workshop flier is available here

By:  Ashley Svaty

July You Asked It!

You Asked It! is a monthly newsletter published each month by the K-State Research and Extension Rapid Response Center. News articles are based on questions received, current food safety issues, or information based on the time of year. Topics featured in the July newsletter include:

  • Salmonella Linked to Backyard Poultry Flocks
  • Food Judge’s Training Tools
  • Most Efficient Appliances for 2017
  • Food Safety Kansas
  • New Recipe Cards from Ball®
  • Fire Up the Grill for Vegetables!
  • Making Pickled Eggs at Home
  • The Story Behind the Fruit Cobbler
  • Making Jam & Jelly with Frozen Fruit
  • How Old are Your Spices?

Enjoy the July newsletter here http://enewsletters.k-state.edu/youaskedit/category/july-2017/.

By:  Ashley Svaty

Food Preservation Questions?

We are here to help! Call, email, or drop by any of our offices and we will answer your food preservation questions.  If you are in need of a tested recipe, unsure about procedures, need your dial gauge checked for accuracy, or anything else please contact Ashley at asvaty@ksu.edu or (785) 524-4432. 

Have you visited The Rapid Response Center site?  It’s a great resource for all your canning needs! Canning videos, publications, recipes, and more can be found at this site.

SAVE THE DATE:  A Food Preservation Workshop will be help on August 9, 2017 in Post Rock District.  Keep watching for more details.  You won’t want to miss this!

By:  Ashley Svaty

June You Asked It!

Interested in any of the following topics? Click on them to find out more or follow this link for the entire June 2017 You Asked It developed by Karen Blakeslee from the K-State Research and Extension Rapid Response Center.

Are All Fruits High in Acid?
National Festival of Breads
Rhubarb and Asparagus After a Frost
USDA to Relax School Meal Mandates
The Scoop on Kitchen Sponges
New Way to Pasteurize Eggs
Flour Recall in Canada
National Kitchen Klutzes of America Day
Color Changes in Red Meat
Grill with the Right Tools!

By:  Ashley Svaty

Safe Summer BBQ’s and Picnics

Summer is a great time to enjoy outdoor meals with family and friends.  Bacteria also loves warmer temperatures so be sure to follow these food safety guidelines when eating outdoors during barbeques and picnics.

  • Cold food should not be left out of the cooler for more than 2 hours.
  • Cook meat and poultry thoroughly to their safe minimum internal temperature.
  • Serve small portions and keep the rest in the cooler.
  • Pack only what you plan to use during your meal.
  • Use separate coolers for drinks so your food cooler is kept closed.

For more tips on how to keep your summer picnics and barbeques safe from foodborne illness, view our Building Strong Families insert here.

By:  Ashley Svaty