Tag: Nutrition

Mediterranean-style Eating Pattern

Mediterranean Diet Pyramid PDF

Studies show that Mediterranean-style diets are remarkably connected with good health, which is the basis for including this eating pattern in the recently revised Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Mediterranean eating patterns are associated with longevity and may decrease your risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease.

The Mediterranean-style diet is reflective of a way of eating that is traditional in countries that surround the Mediterranean Sea. The diet is rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans and peas, whole grains, olive oil and fish. Instead of excess salt, Mediterranean-style foods are flavored with herbs. Sweets are enjoyed in small amounts.

 Here are simple ideas for eating the Mediterranean way.

  • Eat seafood twice a week. Tuna, herring, salmon, and sardines are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Shellfish have similar benefits for brain and heart health. When you eat meat, choose smaller amounts.
  • Enjoy a vegetarian meal one night a week or more. Include beans and legumes, whole grains, and vegetables flavored with herbs and spices.
  • Choose healthy fats, such as extra-virgin olive oil, avocados, nuts, sunflower seeds, olives, and peanuts.
  • Pile on vegetables. These are vitally important to Mediterranean-style eating. Start with a simple plate of sliced fresh tomatoes drizzled with olive oil and feta cheese. Enjoy salads, greens, soups and stews, healthful pizzas, and oven roasted veggies.
  • Switch to whole grains. They taste nuttier and have more fiber. Traditional Mediterranean grains include bulgur, barley, farro, brown rice, and products made with whole-grain flour.
  • Make fruit your dessert. Enjoy a wide range of delicious fresh fruits and pair with cheese or yogurt.

Photo Credit: www.oldwayspt.org

By:  Ashley Svaty

April You Asked It!

In the latest issue of You Asked It! you will find articles on the following topics:

 Freeze-Dried Foods

  • Private Water Well Information
  • Spring Break Food Safety
  • How to Store Honey
  • Long-Term Health Effects of Foodborne Illness
  • Food Preservation Classes Scheduled
  • Explore the NORS Dashboard
  • Keep the Egg Hunt Safe!
  • Add Crunch with Celery!
  • New Items for Food Preservation

 Click here to access the April Issue of You Asked It!

 By:  Ashley Svaty

The Powerful Potency of Plant Foods

For years, nutrition experts have touted the benefits of eating plant foods to combat inflammation and chronic diseases.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered the power of plant foods rich in anthocyanins may have in preventing or reducing colorectal cancer cell growth. Anthocyanins are color pigments that include purple, red, and blue hues.

The research included in vitro studies. They found that the anthocyanin extracts induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. Apoptosis is essentially the destruction of cells so they die. Therefore, the growth of colon cancer is inhibited.

Foods rich in anthocyanins include blueberries, blackberries, cherries, grapes, purple corn, red cabbage, red beets, and many more.

Source: www.ift.org/IFTNEXT/010918.aspx

By:  Ashley Svaty

Focus on the “Stars” For your Holiday Cooking!

Ashley Svaty
Nutrition, Food Safety and Health Agent

Many favorite holiday entrees, sides, and desserts are filled with added fat, sugar, and sodium.  There’s good news though, we can do something about it!  Focus on the healthy “star” ingredient of each dish and cut out the extras that usually bring on the added unnecessary calories. For example, there is a recipe featured in this newsletter for a fall apple crisp.  Compare the nutrition facts with a traditional apple pie and you save 180 calories, 11 fat grams and 18 carbohydrates per serving!

For more information about healthy holiday cooking, view our Focus on the Stars Cooking Healthy for the Holidays publication here.

By:  Ashley Svaty

Fall Apple Crisp

Makes 9 servings

  • 7 cups cored, sliced apples (about 2 lbs. or 5 large apples)
  • ⅓ cup 100% apple juice
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup packed light brown sugar
  • ½ cup rolled oats
  • 5 tablespoons soft tub margarine, cut into small pieces
  • 3 Tablespoons slivered almonds

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375°F.

2. Peel apples, slice, and toss in a mixing bowl with apple juice to coat.

3. Combine flour, both kinds of sugar, and oats in another mixing bowl. Cut       in margarine using two knives until mixture is crumbly. Stir in almonds.

4. Spray a square 8-inch by 2-inch baking dish with non-stick cooking spray.       Pour apples into baking dish and sprinkle with crumb mixture.

5. Bake 45 minutes or until topping turns golden brown.

Source: North Carolina Eat Smart, Move More. Nutrition per 1⁄9 of recipe: 200 calories, 8 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 60 mg sodium, 33 g carbohydrate, 4 g fiber, 22 g sugars, 2 g protein.

For more nutritious recipes, view pages 4-6 of the leaders guide!

By:  Ashley Svaty

Donating Safe and Nutritious Food

The holidays are a great time to donate food to food banks, food drives, and soup kitchens.  Make the most out of your donations by following these guidelines.

  • Donate foods that would fill a healthy and safe plate for the consumer, based on MyPlate recommendations.
  • Cash donations are useful as pantries can generally buy food in bulk for a lower price. Also, they can buy the items most needed by their clients.
  • Do not donate repackaged, expired, or damaged food.
  • Donate water packed, “Low-Sodium”, or “No Salt Added” vegetables and fruit packed in “100% juice”.
  • Donate 100% whole grains. Whole-wheat pasta, barley, brown rice, and wild rice are complex carbohydrates which are more satiating and filling.

For more information please visit the Donating Safe and Nutritious Food to Food Pantries and Soup Kitchens, Fact Sheet Here or Feeding American Healthy Food Drive Donation List Here

By:  Ashley Svaty

Remember MyPlate When Packing Your Child’s Lunch

  • Ashley Svaty
    Nutrition, Food Safety
    and Health Agent

    Focus on colorful veggies. Pack more dark green, red, and orange vegetables for your child to enjoy.

  • Fuel up with fruits! Oranges, pears, berries, peaches, and unsweetened applesauce are a few great choices and will easily fit into a lunch box!
  • Pack calcium-rich foods! Choose low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese for your child. Dairy foods contain calcium for strong bones and healthy teeth. Keep dairy foods cold with an ice pack.
  • Vary the protein you pack. Peanut butter, tuna, or a lean turkey sandwich are great options easy to pack for a lunch. Nuts or a chilled hard-boiled egg are also great options.
  • Shoot for whole grains. Choose whole grain foods, such as whole-wheat bread and whole wheat tortillas instead of white.
  • Don’t forget the water! Encourage your child to drink plenty of water during the day, especially after P.E. and recess. Pack a small water bottle in lunches.

By:  Ashley Svaty

It’s Back to School Time!

Pack the book bags and pack the lunch! It’s time to head back to school! Help get your child to eat the lunch you packed with these tips:

  • Have them help choose foods at the store they like. They can also help pack their lunch.
  • If lunch time is short, pack bite sized foods. Cut sandwiches in fourths to grab easier. Pack grapes, string cheese, and whole wheat crackers.
  • Use easy open lunch bags and insulated bags with ice packs to keep cold foods cold.
  • Pack smaller portions so they don’t waste food. Keep nutrition in mind to give them good fuel on the go!

Source: www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/eat-right-at-school/my-child-doesnt-eat-the-lunch-i-pack-what-do-i-do

By:  Ashley Svaty

July You Asked It!

You Asked It! is a monthly newsletter published each month by the K-State Research and Extension Rapid Response Center. News articles are based on questions received, current food safety issues, or information based on the time of year. Topics featured in the July newsletter include:

  • Salmonella Linked to Backyard Poultry Flocks
  • Food Judge’s Training Tools
  • Most Efficient Appliances for 2017
  • Food Safety Kansas
  • New Recipe Cards from Ball®
  • Fire Up the Grill for Vegetables!
  • Making Pickled Eggs at Home
  • The Story Behind the Fruit Cobbler
  • Making Jam & Jelly with Frozen Fruit
  • How Old are Your Spices?

Enjoy the July newsletter here http://enewsletters.k-state.edu/youaskedit/category/july-2017/.

By:  Ashley Svaty