Beef Tips

Category: Management Minute

January 2020 Management Minute

“How to Find More Time in the New Year”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

One of the more common New Year’s resolutions is to find more time for family, friends, exercise or some new activity. However, the question becomes, how can we find more time within the day or week for the aforementioned activity of choice. One of the ways that many people try to find more time (including myself) is the “do I really need that much sleep” method of finding more time. Although, this method does work; it may also result in some undesirable outcomes, especially if the activity involves interacting with others. Time management experts suggest that the best way to make more time for any new activity is to become more efficient within our day. Efficiency is essentially organizing and prioritizing the daily “to do list” but it also includes looking for places in our day where we simply waste time. The most common “time waster” for many people involves a computer or a phone in today’s world. Procrastination is also another common “time waster” that reduces our ability to get things done. Many strategies have been developed to combat procrastination. One simple strategy that I recently came across is the two-minute rule and it essentially targets all those little things that we encounter during the day that eventually add up. This informal rule essentially says that when we encounter anything in our day that will take less than two-minutes that we should do it, be it a quick email response or cleaning up our computer files. It is difficult to find more time in our busy work schedules, but one thing is clear seconds turn into minutes, minutes into hours, hours into days and so forth, which proves that little things do add up over time.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

December 2019 Management Minute

“Winter Safety in the Workplace”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

Winter is here and many agriculture workers work in the elements, which brings a new set of seasonal workplace hazards. Falls, slips, and trips are one of the most common causes of workplace injuries (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2017). Although falls and slips can occur anytime, extra precautions are required during the winter months. Hypothermia is real, especially for those that work in the elements. Safety experts suggest that clothing should be layered to retain body heat. However, how and what type of layers those clothes are made of is important. At least three layers are recommended. Cotton or other breathable synthetic fiber should be the first or base layer, wool or down is suggested for the middle layer, and the third or outer layer should be composed of material that will block the wind such as a nylon outer shell found on many ski-jackets, etc. Portable heaters are often used as heat sources in many shops and barns. Portable heaters are one of the most common causes of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires. If heaters are used in confined spaces, keep in mind that ventilation is required to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Additionally, the areas where heaters are used should be checked for combustible materials.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

November 2019 Management Minute

“The Power of Praise”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

Praise is likely one of the most powerful tools in the toolbox of any manager, leader or educator. I recently came across a summary of a research project conducted by Elizabeth Hurlock, which illustrates the power of praise in the book “How Full is Your Bucket” by Tom Rath and Don Clifton. This experiment evaluated the subsequent math scores of students who received different types of feedback (control, praise, criticism, or ignored) regarding their work in the classroom. Initially, the math scores of students who were praised or criticized for their work were similar. However, by day five of the experiment, the relative improvement in the scores of students who were praised improved by 71%, while those that were criticized improved 19% and those that were ignored improved only 5%. What surprised me the most about this study was that it was conducted in 1925, 94 years ago. Praise is a powerful tool that can be used to motivate all of us to do what we do better and that should not be overlooked.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

October 2019 Management Minute

“Good Help is Hard to Find”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

“Good help is hard to find” which alternatively means that the “good help we have is worth retaining”. I recently had a conversation with a colleague who is changing positions, as we discussed some of the challenges associated with the transition, from selling a house, to placing children in a new school. I found myself considering why do good people leave positions? Given the magnitude of the challenges associated with making a professional change. In some instances, people do get the opportunity to pursue their dream job. In other situations, life circumstances such as children or being closer to family are cited as common reasons. However, according to www.thebalancecareer.com the most common people leave jobs are ultimately related to factors within the workplace, such as a bad boss or supervisor, lack of trust within the organization, failing to recognize the employee’s contributions or strengths, or the inability to use their skills. Many of these reasons come down to job satisfaction, and creating an environment where people want to come to work. We spend roughly 1/3 of our day at work, so creating a positive work environment, where employees feel valued and trust that supervisors and the organization cares about them can go along way towards retaining the good help we have today.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

September 2019 Management Minute

“Are you a Manager or a Leader?”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

I recently came across an article that contrasted management and leadership (Learning for future and personal and business success by Bob Milligan). Many of you, like myself, who always arrive at the most logical conclusion quickly are likely saying “a manager is a leader” and, yes, that is true. However, there is a difference between the roles and responsibilities of managers and leaders. Leaders give an organization direction. Leaders focus on the future by motivating individuals or groups of individuals. Managers tend to be less focused on the future, and more on the here and now. Managers organize, plan, budget and ultimately implement the vision of the leader. Are you a leader or a manager? Is it possible to be both? As organizations and businesses grow larger, structure becomes more important because of the established fact that it is “hard to see tomorrow, when you are buried in today.”

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

August 2019 Management Minute

“Customer Service”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

Good customer service is essential to any business or organization. It does not matter if it is a restaurant or a tow truck service, having staff members who leave customers or anyone who encounters your business with that “wow that was great” feeling directly influences the bottom line. Customer service has become more important than ever as more consumers are gathering information and making purchasing decisions based on social media. What is customer service? Customer service is simply defined as the assistance provided by a company to those who purchase the goods or services it provides. Now on to the tough part, how do we as businesses or organizations provide that assistance?

Susan Ward (www.thebalancesmb.com) offers a few simple things that businesses can do to improve their customer service experiences. First, answer the phone. Potential customers want to talk to a person and don’t want to leave a message. Second, don’t make promises you can’t keep. As the old saying goes “say what you are going to do and do what you said you were going to”. Third, listen. Simply listening to what a potential customer needs is important, there is nothing worse than listening to a sales pitch for something you don’t want. Fourth, be helpful even if you don’t make the sale today. The service provided today has the potential to turn in to something much larger in the future. Fifth, train your staff to do something extra, like showing the customer where the product is located. Lastly, empower your staff to offer something extra without asking permission.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

Management Minute

“Think Safety this Summer, Agriculture is a High Risk Occupation”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

Most of you reading this are likely involved in agriculture in some capacity. Do you think being a farmer or rancher is a high risk occupation?

The reality is that farming and ranching is a high risk occupation. A 2017 report from the U. S. Department of Labor contains some staggering statistics and emphasizes the need for safety. There were 5147 fatal workrelated injuries in 2017. Farmers, ranchers, and agriculture managers were the second greatest civilian occupation with regard to fatal work-related injuries; with 258 reported fatalities in 2017.

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June 2019 Management Minute

“Tell Me Something Good”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

I recently came across an interesting statistic attributed to the Gallup organization that suggests that 75% of us are at some level of disengagement with life. That essentially means that 25% of those surveyed were satisfied (happy) with where they were at in life. Does this carry over into the workplace? Absolutely.

Clint Swindall of Verbalocity Inc., a personal development company, breaks it down a bit further. “There are three types of people in an organization: 32 percent who are engaged, 50 percent who are disengaged and 18 percent who are actively disengaged. The actively disengaged people are called the “Oh No’s” because they dread being asked to work. The engaged people are called the “Oh Yes’s” because they will do whatever is asked of them with enthusiasm no matter what the task is.”

As humans it is really easy for us to get caught up in the negativity around us. Let’s face it…it is really difficult for most of us (75%) to see the opportunity in a given situation whether it is in our professional or personal life. What do you discuss at work or at home at the dinner table? The good stuff that happens during your day or the things that could have been better?

So the bigger question is what do we do about it? Clint Swindall suggests that we replace the traditional greeting of “How are you?” with “Tell me something good.” I can assure you that you will receive some really odd looks the first time you try it. However, some people will be more than willing to share something good about what is going on at work or at home. It will take some time, but maybe some of those “Oh No’s” will become “Oh Yes’s” in the workplace.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

May 2019 Management Minute

“Hiring the Best Person”

By: Justin Waggoner, Ph.D., Beef Systems Specialist

Whether you are a small business with just a few employees or a larger enterprise with several employees, hiring the right person for a position is essential. Making a good hiring decision can inspire others and improve the operations productivity. The unfortunate truth is that the number of qualified applicants for most skilled position isn’t large. “Good people are truly hard to find.”  So what can you as a potential employer do to attract and hire the best person for a position? There are many thoughts on this topic.  However, most experts agree that knowing what you are looking for and clearly stating the roles and responsibilities of the position is a great place to start. Applicants want/need to know the expectations of the position. Another point of consensus on the topic is to involve others in the hiring process. Allowing the candidates to interact with others in the organization through tours, or an informal dinner, can be a great way to know whether a person is a good fit.  An informal setting often allows an employer to gather more information about the applicant than the traditional interview questions can allow. People spend a great deal of time at work, thus co-workers, colleagues and the culture of the organization is important to both parties. Additionally, different people have different perspectives on the applicants, and usually there is some degree of consensus. Lastly, be prepared to move quickly with a competitive offer. The best people will usually have multiple opportunities.

For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.

April 2019 Management Minute

“Leadership Styles”
By: Justin Waggoner

The most commonly recognized leadership styles are authoritarian, democratic and laissez-faire. However, there may be seven to twelve different leadership styles that include styles such as transformational, transactional, servant, charismatic, and situational. Although some of these leadership styles are unique, there is also some degree of similarities or overlap as well and in some cases, a leader may change their leadership styles to fit the situation (situational). The concept of situational leadership was first recognized by Paul Hersey and Ken Blanchard (author of the “One Minute Manager”). They recognized that successful leaders often adapted their leadership style or styles to the individual or group they were leading. Collectively these different leadership styles remind us that leadership is complicated and we still have a lot to learn about leadership. For more information, contact Justin Waggoner at jwaggon@ksu.edu.