Category: December 2016

December Babysitting Clinic

Nora Rhoades Family and Youth Development Agent
Nora Rhoades
Family and Youth
Development Agent

Calling all youth 10 years and up! Join us at the Super Sitter Babysitting Clinic on December 21, 2016 in Beloit to practice using powers that will improve your ability to keep children happy and healthy as you go about your babysitting adventures.

Babysitting powers you’ll learn and practice include: meeting a child’s needs throughout their daily routine; basic first aid & emergency preparedness; easy-to-prepare nutritious snacks and meals; interacting with children as they grow, play and learn; and managing parent expectations. Space is limited, so register soon! Registration information and complete clinic details can be found at http://www.postrock.k-state.edu/events/.

By: Nora Rhoades

Safe Winter Driving Tips

Ashley Svaty Nutrition, Food Safety and Health Agent
Ashley Svaty
Nutrition, Food Safety and Health Agent

Winter weather will be here before we know it, below are tips from the Kansas Department of Transportation for winter driving. The full article is available at http://bit.ly/1PjJtBT .

  • If the weather is bad, remember Ice and Snow, Take It Slow, or just don’t go.
  • Be aware of the latest weather conditions by visiting kandrive.org, calling 5-1-1 from anywhere in Kansas or1-866-511-KDOT (5368), or visiting 511 Mobile at http://511mm.ksdot.org
  • Prepare your vehicle, check your tires, wiper blades, fluids, lights, belts, and hoses.
  • Remove any snow on your vehicle’s windows, lights, brake lights and signals. Make sure you can see and be seen.
  • Leave with plenty of time to reach your destination safely.
  • In snowy conditions, drive well below the posted speed limit and leave plenty of room between cars.
  • Don’t talk on your cell phone or use your mobile device while driving.

By:  Ashley Svaty

Navigating a Struggling Farm Economy

A one-day program, Top 10 Considerations to Navigate a Struggling Farm Economy, is planned in eight communities across Kansas. The K-State Research and Extension program will help producers think critically about how their farms might withstand the tough times. Each presentation topic will provide a framework to evaluate options and opportunities. They include: maintaining working capital; restructuring debt; managing machinery expenses; family living expenses; enterprise diversification; safety nets; income tax management and more. Complete program details, host locations, and registration information can be found at http://www.postrock.k-state.edu/events/.

By:  Nora Rhoades

Grocery Shopping with Little Ones

Do you find grocery shopping with little ones a bit challenging? We are here to help, find tips below and in our latest “Building Strong Families” to help your family succeed at the grocery store!grocery-shopping-with-little-ones

  • Talk with your children about what you expect from them, what you will purchase, and how they will help with this process.
  • Tell your child that they can pick one new fruit or vegetable to try. Kids are much more likely to try new foods if they are allowed to choose it themselves.
  • Eat a meal or snack before heading out. Shopping on an empty stomach may lead to impulse buys.
  • Discuss MyPlate with your child and talk about where each food item will fit on their plate. This is a great opportunity to talk to them about the importance of eating a variety of food.
  • Allow your child to pick foods in each color of the rainbow. This can be a fun game to play as they are learning their colors.

By:  Ashley Svaty

Tips for Spending Quality Time with Your Child

It isn’t about endless hours of time – it’s about how you choose to spend that time that truly matters. Checkout the National Association for the Educational of Young Children’s blog for insight and simple tips that can improve the quality of time you spend building connections with your child. Tips for Spending Quality Time with Your Child

By:  Nora Rhoades

December You Asked It!

Below are the article topics featured in the latest issue of You Asked It!  Full articles can be accessed at http://bit.ly/2fEphM6.

  • It’s Cookie Time!
  • Clean the Fridge for the Holidays
  • An Egg a Day May Reduce Risk of Strokesdecember-you-asked-it
  • Preserving Horseradish
  • It’s Citrus Season!
  • Life Before the Food and Drug Administration
  • Blood Spots in Eggs
  • Sweet Potato vs. Yam
  • After the Hunt: Preserving Venison
  • Storing Holiday Leftovers

By:  Ashley Svaty

Is Clutter a Problem?

Do you say, “This house is a mess” more than three times a week? Do you… move something every time you want to sit down? have piles of paper all over the house? have closets and drawers that are brimming? spend lots of time looking for things? Do you frequently hear family member say, “I can’t find it”? Do you tire of being the family’s chief picker-upper? Does this sound like you? If so, it is time to take control of the clutter at your house. Checkout the K-State Research and Extension resource to help you Cut the Clutter and Get Organized.

By: Nora Rhoades

Walking Safely at Night

Many of us find ourselves coming home near dusk or even dark.  Does this mean we should skip our evening physical activity?  No way.  Follow these tips to stay safe while walking at night.walking-safely-at-night

  1. Wear reflective gear. Being seen is important while walking in dim light to ensure safety. Some fitness pants and jackets have reflectors built in but if not, a reflective vest, belt, or straps can do the trick.
  2. Light the way. Use a headlamp or flashlight to clearly see your route.
  3. Be cautious of traffic. Always walk or run on a sidewalk if possible.  If no sidewalk is available, face oncoming traffic so you can see upcoming headlights and move out of the way.  Hearing traffic is important so skip the headphones at night.
  4. Bring a friend. Not only for company to make the walk more enjoyable but drivers are more likely to see two people rather than if you ventured out alone.
  5. Stay warm. Temperatures can drop quickly once the sun goes down. Remember you can always take off layers and tie a jacket around your waist.

By:  Ashley Svaty