Tag: Pests

Horticulture Hot Topics Webinar Series

Educational Seminars:

  • Herbs- From Seed to Seasoning, May 7 at 3:00p.m.
  • Lawn Care Basics for Kansas, May 14 at 3:00p.m.
  • Veggie Gardening 101, May 21 at 7:00p.m.
  • Dealing with the Dreaded Bagworm, May 28 at 7:00p.m.


Learn how to care for your landscape with this free webinar series!

Cassie Homan, Post Rock Horticulture Agent and Kelsey Hatesohl, River Valley Horticulture Agent are hosting an online learning workshop!

Registration-

Pre-registration is required for this FREE online event. Registration is required by 4:00 p.m. the day prior to the webinar. To register email choman@ksu.edu or khatesohl@ksu.edu and you will be sent the Zoom Link.

All webinars will be recorded and made available on our websites.

To download the free Zoom platform visit: https://zoom.us/download

For more details visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/3744893858917261/

By: Cassie Homan

Wildlife Management Website Resource

Most people enjoy the wide variety of wildlife found in Kansas until that wildlife becomes a nuisance or damages property.  Charlie Lee, K-State Wildlife Management Specialist, has put together a web site on wildlife management at http://www.wildlife.k-state.edu/.  Species covered include everything from bats to woodrats.  Each species page also incorporates quick links for more in-depth information.  One of our most common pest species, moles, includes videos on tracking an active tunnel and setting a mole trap.

This site is an excellent resource for the various options of dealing with our interactions with wildlife in a safe and effective manner.

By: Cassie Homan

How to Get Rid of Asparagus Beetles

If you are growing asparagus, then it is that time of year to be aware of the only insect pest of asparagus; the common asparagus beetle. Adult beetles are only 1/4 inch long. Adults emerge from the soil in early spring and fly to new asparagus shoots where they mate and feed. Females lay up to 30 eggs on the end of spear tips as they emerge from the soil.

Common asparagus beetles overwinter underneath plant debris, loose bark, or hollow stems of old asparagus plants. The life cycle can be completed in eight-weeks. There are two generations in Kansas. The adults and larvae feed on asparagus spears and can defoliate ferns if populations are extensive. Larvae consume leaves and tender buds near the tips, which leaves scars that eventually turn brown. Damage caused by larvae interferes with the plant’s ability to photosynthesize (manufacture food); thus, depleting food reserves for next year’s crop.

To help protect your asparagus patch from beetles: applying insecticides; handpick eggs, adults, and larvae and place into a container with soapy water; and/or remove any plant debris after the growing season to eliminate overwintering sites for adults. Insecticides should be applied as soon as common asparagus beetles are present, and again in late summer through early fall to kill adults before they overwinter. Thorough coverage of all plant parts is important in suppressing populations.

By: Cassie Homan