Category: June 2018

Making Career Connections

Young children begin acting out their futures through play with limitless imaginations about their talents and interests. As youth grow, teenagers inherit desires to self-explore while developing a unique definition of individuality. With self-exploration comes an increased expectation of responsibility and a greater understanding of one’s community, culture and society. It is throughout one’s adolescent years when career exploration becomes a decision-making process, which aligns values with talents in order to pursue a career that meets needs while also providing satisfaction.

Summer vacation is a great opportunity for teens to focus on career exploration.

  • Interview people who are employed in an occupation.
  • Job shadow someone in a career appealing to you.
  • Serve an internship or apply for a part-time job with a business or organization.
  • Volunteer with an organization, doing tasks relevant to your possible future career.
  • Attend a career fair or a job fair.

As you go about your exploration, be sure to pay attention to detail and take notes. Career decision-making will require a lot of personal reflection to best determine what opportunities are a good fit. Some things to consider include:

  • What personal characteristics, qualities, skills, and abilities are needed to work in this career?
  • What are two or more characteristics of this position that appeal to me?
  • Describe a typical work day or work week?
  • Would I enjoy doing this every day? Why or why not?
  • What steps must I take to prepare myself to work in this career (such as education, licensing, certification)?
  • What can I learn in school that will help me in this career?
  • What are the working conditions and physical demands of this career?
  • What are the benefits of this career (such as salary, health, and travel)?
  • What are future prospects and outlook for this career?

By:  Nora Rhoades

Enough with the “Blame Game”

We have all dealt with a spouse, friend, child or co-worker who has a behavior or attitude that drives you crazy. Sometimes these behaviors and attitudes break policy or laws while other times they just bring negativity into the environment. Simply ignoring these annoyances is not the answer, especially if they reoccur on a regular basis. Addressing differences can be stressful, but not addressing them can result in unproductive work environments, strained relationships, and many bad moods.

How you address behaviors and attitudes that ‘push your buttons’ is very important in gaining the outcomes you desire. Blaming language brings out defense mechanisms, often steering the conversation away from the concern. Avoid using the word “you”. “You” statements accuse actions, ideas, and people to be in the wrong. Blaming language not only takes longer to reach a resolution, it rarely makes a relationship stronger through the process.

Instead, use “I” statements. “I” statements keep your responses focused on how the concern affects you. Meanwhile, the other party will feel invited to explain how they are affected by the concern. “I” statements seek to understand and respect both party’s opinions and experiences. These types of conversations may provide values clarification, likely pointing towards a compromise that will benefit everyone.

                         Communicate with “I” Statements

I feel: (label your feeling: betrayed, proud, anxious, vulnerable, etc…),
When: (give specific example)      _                                              .
Because: (briefly explain ‘why’)                                                    .
What I want/need is: (describe what would make you feel better)    .

By:  Nora Rhoades

You Asked It!

The June issue of You Asked It! is now available.  Featured in this issue you will find timely topics regarding:

  • Eating Out by the Numbers
  • CFSAN Resources for You!
  • New Food Preservation Resources
  • Using Natural Pectin in Fruit Pie
  • Food Safety for Moms-to-Be
  • Preserve Smart App
  • Summer Ag Adventure Challenge
  • How to make Cherry Raisins
  • Canning in Half-Gallon Jars
  • Beyond the Trash Can

Access the June issue here.

By:  Ashley Svaty